Community Ausangate 4200msnm.

The mountain chain of the Ausangate is situated in the Cordillera

IMG-20150405-WA0003Vilcanota in the department of Cusco. It is one of the most remote high Andean zones of Peru and offers a spectacular trekking circuit along snow-capped peaks, lagoons, ice caverns, and thermal waters. Furthermore, it represents a thousand-year-old culture. Ausangate is the ultimate trekking destination in the Cusco area. This beautiful snow-capped peak is one of the main features of the Cusco skyline but very few people actually ever see it up close. The area around Ausangate is full of natural beauty; with azure lakes and the majestic snow-capped peak ever present, trekking here is truly amazing.The 8day Ausangate trek really allows you to see a part of Peru few ever visit, this unforgettable trail is perfect for people who love to get away from it all. By booking the Ausangate Trek with you are choosing the best. Don’t believe us? Check out our reviews on

Two -Week Volunteering in Community Ausangate.

Two -Week Volunteering
Our Volunteer Program is one of Andean Lodges´ initiatives, as it has

IMG-20150405-WA0008been designed to generate and promote cultural and educational exchanges between college students and residents of Chillca and Osefina, mainly aiming at promoting community member development, through varied training in service, weaving techniques and creating microbusinesses, among others.
On the other hand, the students assimilate all they can about the community´s customs, duties and daily lifestyles, while learning to live in a natural and Andean rural environment, above 4,000 m. in altitude, and to handle the available natural resources.

Pacchanta comunity

Comunitys Near the Mountain!..The Pacchanta comunity is located in the base of the Sacred Mountain “Ausangate” at an altitude of 13500 feet. It takes 3 hours to get there from Cusco, through the new Interoceanic road to Brasil.
The local peoples’main activities are potato farming and alpaca breeding, and all of them are expert weavers! With alpaca fiber they make their dressing/clothing and tools, such as ropes and sacks; and use the meat to provide protein. Native potatoes, fresh or converted into chuño and moraya, bring the carbohydrates that they need to resist cold and physical work.
Men and women of Pacchanta, care a lot about their cultural identity and traditional way of life, what makes them into representatives of the high Andean culture.During your staying, we’ll discober the magic of the glaciars and the heat of their people, that will proudly share with you their life and traditions.it was really nice meeting with them

Cordillera Vilcanota

The mountain chain of the Ausangate is situated in the Cordillera Vilcanota in the department of Cusco. It is one of the most remote DSCN9112high Andean zones of Peru and offers a spectacular trekking circuit along snow-capped peaks, lagoons, ice caverns, and thermal waters. Furthermore, it represents a thousand-year-old culture. Ausangate is the ultimate trekking destination in the Cusco area. This beautiful snow-capped peak is one of the main features of the Cusco skyline but very few people actually ever see it up close. The area around Ausangate is full of natural beauty; with azure lakes and the majestic snow-capped peak ever present, trekking here is truly amazing.The 8day Ausangate trek really allows you to see a part of Peru few ever visit, this unforgettable IMG_20150723_155956164_HDRtrail is perfect for people who love to get away from it all. By booking the Ausangate Trek with Llamapath you are choosing the best. Don’t believe us? Check out our reviews on

Full Day Rainbow Mountain

Journey through an undiscovered land of wild desert landscapes, snow capped peaks, herds of alpaca, and arrive at the ultimate destination- The paIMG-20170227-WA0016inted hills hidden deep in the Andes.
Throughout your journey you will pass through a vibrant green valley with the impressive Ausangate mountain towering in the distance. You will experience first hand how locals live in the mountains and even see them hard at work. As you get closer to the Rainbow Mountain you will begin to see the first signs of the colored minerals that formed the painted hills. Your guide will explain what makes up the existence of the Rainbow Mountain, and finally with one last push you will hike up to a vantage point that gives you a 360 degree view of the beautiful landscape that makes up the sacred land, contac with us: http://wayraperutravel.com/

Community Chincheros

 

Chinchero, a community of about 20,000 Quechua speakers, is situated on a plain at 3800 m. in the Peruvian Andes near Cuzco. The primary economic activity in Chinchero is potato agriculture, but in recent years tourism has increased drastically. The proposed location of the Cuzco International Airport in Chinchero threatens to both destroy fields and expand the number of visitors.

Tourists are attracted by Chinchero’s spectacular setting, Inca ruins, people, and Sunday barter market. In spite of these outside influences Andean people are far more resilient in the face of cultural challenges than one might imagine.

Tourists are only the most recent agents of change in Chinchero. They were preceded by the Spanish and the Incas. Chinchero residents have always been regarded as independent, even contrary, by their neighbors. Their strong sense of cultural identity has kept them dressed and weaving differently from their neighbors. Women wove cloth for their own families, in the recognized style of the community. A few older women with extra time contracted weaving for other families, usually with materials brought to them.

Although such exchanges still take place, the arrival of thousands of tourists to the Cuzco area every year has created a new market for woven goods. Weavers do not market their own products; instead, middlemen travel to the outlying areas of Cuzco trading alcohol, rice, sugar, and some money for textiles, which they in turn sell in the markets and stores of Cuzco, Lima, and the U.S. for tremendous profits.

Alert Chinchero businesswomen recognized the potential in this market, and began marketing directly to tourists in the plazas of Chinchero and Cuzco. The weaver can depend on selling many small items every week (e.g. belts); but cannot count on selling even one larger project. Further, the tourist is ignorant of the weaver’s craft and cannot tell the difference between easy and complicated patterns and techniques, synthetic or handspun yarns, etc.

 

Chinchero women now weave “ley” (supplementary-warp) belts in gaudy colors of Dralon yarn. Three can be woven per day and sold for $2 each. Young girls are now learning to weave only these “ley” belts, rather than traditional larger cloths and more complicated patterns.

The artistic deterioration of Chinchero weaving will be halted only when the weavers once again value their own tradition and when consumers learn to recognize and value fine weaving. Education has appeared to be the best solution. Towards this goal, the Chinchero Center for Traditional Culture was established.

The idea for the Center arose from town discussions. In 1977, the American Museum of Natural History commissioned a series of textiles. We explained to the weavers the destination of their work. One villager asked, “So you mean all those textiles that foreigners have bought from me over the years, are all in museums?” Further explanation of what a museum was led to the obvious question, “Could we have a museum?” To which we answered yes, of course. The town provided a building; Cultural Survival, Earthwatch, and other donors provided funds and time.

In May, 1980 the Center opened its doors, housing exhibits of traditional agriculture, ritual and household life, and art based on photographs, tape recordings and artifacts. The Center is accessible to tourists but was designed for the residents of Chinchero.

The Center also includes an archive of photographs, tape recordings, and other kinds of information which we hope will make it possible for young people to learn about traditional Chinchero, even after the old people are gone. The museum utilizes media impressiveness to lend prestige to traditional life. Although Chincherinos are among the most-photographed people in the Andes, having even served as a set for a Hollywood movie (The Last Movie), few photographs found their way back to Chinchero. In the same way, little had remained there from the countless anthropologists who have worked there over the past forty years. Finally, we wanted to bring to Chinchero some of the results of our work.

Isolating Chincherinos from the intrusion of modern goods, people, and ideas is not only impossible, but not necessarily desirable. Chinchero people want to pick and choose among traditional and modern lifestyles to find one that is truly their own.

As people acquire needs for money, marketing of crafts may be the only way these arts can survive. Certainly a weaver can earn as much as a waitress or a maid, other avenues of employment open to Chinchero women. The present marketing structure, however, gives advantage to the middleman and undermines the quality of production. The Chinchero Center will help weavers in Chinchero to know the value of their own work, and to hold out against middlemen who tell them it is worth little. It will also encourage young people to learn to weave. In the future a cooperative alternative marketing structure for traditional crafts in the Cuzco area might benefit local weavers. A number of people have suggested annual textile fairs, where recognition and prizes would be given for fine weaving.

North Americans have much to learn about the real nature of traditional Andean weaving. In 1981, through the auspices of Cultural Survival and the American Indian Community House in New York, Nilda Callanaupa, a fine weaver and Chinchero’s first female university student, visited the United States, lecturing and demonstrating her craft as well as practicing some reverse tourism.

 

 

Ausangate 2 Days

Share the experience with Native Community 

2017-02-09_02-36-01[1]Great short hike through Singrenacocha & Ausangate Mountain: This trek takes us along the spectacular slopes of Ausangate Mountain, the highest peak in the Cusco Region. On the way we will see a number of communities where we will be able to observe the local way of life. We will also pass a number of lovely lakes on our way to the impressive Singrenacocha Lagoon.
Itinerary
Day 1 – Cusco / Auangate Community
Pick up from the Hotel at 7:00 am drive in our private transport to Ocongate (3900m/12795ft) situated southeast of Cusco. During the walk we will observe beautiful natural scenery when we are passing high Andean plateaus. The presence of mountains, lagoons and rivers makes it unimaginable scenery. Arriving in Ocongate , we will take a fresh walk of about 3 hours, during which we will enjoy the spectacular view on the Callangate Mountain that borders to our Community where we can stay overnight with the Local community.
Meals Included: lunch, Dinner

Day 2 – Auangate Community / Walking to
Breakfast; the sunrise over the Cordillera Vilcanota is very spectacular, with the scenery of glaciers, lagoons etc. around us. In spite of being high in the Andes, some flowers and plants knew to develop, such as the Andean Cactus. Also Camelids, Chinchillins, In the afternoon we can back to Cusco.